Developer surface

I mentioned this concept before, and I feel like it’s worth expanding on a little bit. If we are in the business of making a product that developers rely on to create user experiences, the developer surface of this product is the union of all means through which developers create these experiences. 

Let’s unpack this, starting with a simple case. Suppose you and I decided to ship a library that has one function. Applying the definition, that library is the product and its developer surface is the function. Easy, right? As our product becomes popular, we start noticing something weird. Remember that one-line file where we track the version of the library, just for ourselves? Well, turns out some developers started using its contents in their build. So when we thought — “oh hey, let’s just delete that file, we don’t need it anymore” — all hell broke loose? That file became developer surface, too!

In mature developer-facing products, the developer surface becomes far more than just the API. Shipping samples along with the library? Yep, these are part of the developer surface, too. Got some clever heuristics deep in your code? Or maybe just bugsHyrum’s Law captures beautifully the spirit of this phenomenon: 

With a sufficient number of users of an API,
it does not matter what you promise in the contract:
all observable behaviors of your system
will be depended on by somebody.

This sufficiently high number of API users can truly mess with what is or is not a developer surface. While we imagine the contract with developers as a crisp document of high transparency and clarity, we are usually mesmerized by the messy innards that are the outcome of developers just trying to get things to work. Even messier in comparison will be our attempts to convince developers to use the APIs the way we intended.

When we embark on a project that intends to ship a developer-facing product, it’s worth planning the work and structuring the team in a way that anticipates this messiness. We are not writing the developer contract. Developers write the contract with us, and frequently, their contributions carry more weight. Walking this line of carrying our original intention while having awareness of where the developers want to take is not something that comes intuitively or easily.

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